Literacy Resources

Family Literacy

Book Cuddling

Ron Sutton presented a workshop titled “Book Cuddling” at the TACH State Conference held in Ulverstone in September 2012.

Ron Sutton’s presentation looked at the critical role parents play in the literacy development of their children.  What parents believe, say and do makes a difference.  Parents and young children reading together fosters early brain development, parent-child bonding and early literacy skills.  The session looked at children’s books, how to use them and other ways to engage parents and children with reading, with some background information on the importance of family literacy.  His PowerPoint presentation can be viewed here (Note: this presentation file is over 23Mb and includes an embedded video so it will take a while to open or download).

 

For Dads

Dad’s Playbook – Coaching Kids to Read is a colourful and engaging booklet aimed at encouraging Dad’s to read with their pre-school and primary school aged children.

Boys in particular are often strongly influenced in their reading behaviour by the reading habits of their Dads.  This poster encourages Dads to get involved in reading with their children.

 

Reading Aloud and Preschool Literacy

Reading aloud to preschool aged children (and yes, even young babies) is one of the most important things a parent or carer can do to begin developing emergent literacy skills that will ready children for later beginning to learn to read.

Mem Fox, the well know Australian author is passionate about the importance of reading aloud to children and gives some useful advice in these Ten Read Aloud Commandments.

Jim Trelease, the well known American author of “The Read-Aloud Handbook”, had some good advice in the brochure Thirty Do’s to Remember When Reading Aloud.

The National Institute for Literacy has published a brief and easy to understand booklet about reading for the preschool to grade three age group titled Big Dreams.

The excellent website www.childrens-books-and-reading.com contains a lot of useful information and resources, some of which is collated for easy reference as Help Your Child to Develop Preschool Literacy Skills.

Also containing  a range of ideas for working with young children and preschool literacy are these resources from Canada and the United States:

A Child Becomes A Reader

Books In The Home

123 Rhyme With Me

 

School Age Children

This Canadian manual titled Family Tutoring, published by the North West Territories Literacy Council, is a guide for parents, carers, teachers and other adults working with school age children to improve family literacy outcomes.  Note that this is a large file and may take a while to download.

 

Health Literacy

Though based on American research, the Health Literacy Fact Sheets highlight the potential impacts low literacy levels can have in dealing with health care information.

 

Literacy levels are an issue in our communities – around half of residents do not have all the literacy skills they need to cope well with the demands of modern life.  Literacy and health are closely linked. When people think about the links between them, they tend to think about the difficulty people may have reading instructions on medicines. But the connections between literacy and health go well beyond a person’s ability to read.  A recent report on the health of Canadians shows that people with low literacy skills are more likely than those with higher literacy skills to be unemployed, poorer, have poorer health and die earlier.  Similar results apply in Australia.  This Canadian Health Check – Health and Literacy Program contains lots of information, activities and other ways of addressing this issue.

General Adult Literacy Publications and Information

Planning and Delivering Literacy Projects

The Tools for Community Building Workbook provides a clear guide to help people plan community based projects.  It is a step by step guide to support community development.

This workbook can help you if you want to:

  • Work together with others to make your community stronger.
  • Plan a local community development project.
  • Write a proposal to support your project.
  • Develop a communication strategy for your project.
  • Write an evaluation report at the end of your project.

The workbook was prepared by the North West Territories Literacy Council for working in communities in the far north of Canada, often in predominantly Inuit communities.  The workbook is nevertheless full of good ideas for literacy projects in Neighbourhood House communities here in Australia.

 

Facilitating a group, whether is a series of classes or a workshop can be a little intimidating if you are new to doing it.  Even for experienced facilitators, classess and workshops require a lot of preparation and work even before you get to the them. Facilitating a class or workshop is usually just the tip of the iceberg. A lot of planning and organizing goes on beforehand and behind the scenes that the participants don’t even see. This Facilitating a Workshop How to Kit includes information, tips and suggestions to help you in planning and facilitating classes or workshops.  It is another useful resource from the North West Territories Literacy Council.

Conference and Workshop Presentations

TACH State Conference 2010

A workshop on creative approaches to community literacy programs was held at the 2010 TACH State Conference.

Hugh Fielding’s presentation looked at the implications for people who get through to adulthood without literacy skills, how that manifests in their adult lives and how individualised literacy support can be provided by volunteer literacy tutors.  Notes on his presentation can be read here.

Dr Terry Whitebeach spoke about her experiences and approaches in working on adult literacy projects for people in the communities of a group of Neighbourhood Houses in southern Tasmania.  Notes on her presentation can be read here.

 

TACH State Conference 2012

Ron Sutton presented a workshop titled “Book Cuddling” at the TACH State Conference held in Ulverstone in September 2012.

Ron Sutton’s presentation looked at the critical role parents play in the literacy development of their children.  What parents believe, say and do makes a difference.  Parents and young children reading together fosters early brain development, parent-child bonding and early literacy skills.  The session looked at children’s books, how to use them and other ways to engage parents and children with reading, with some background information on the importance of family literacy.  His PowerPoint presentation can be viewed here (Note: this presentation file is over 23Mb and includes an embedded video so it will take a while to open or download).